CW_QRP_PSK_RTTY_HomeBuilt of the Globe.

Low power amateur "ham" radio and building antennas,for CW, QRP,PSK, and RTTY, communications. By KB5DOH Allan

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ARLD003 DX news

Posted by Allan kb5doh on January 18, 2013 at 9:30 PM Comments comments (0)

:D :D :D :D

SB DX @ ARL $ARLD003

ARLD003 DX news

ZCZC AE03

QST de W1AW

DX Bulletin 3 ARLD003

From ARRL Headquarters

Newington CT January 17, 2013

To all radio amateurs

SB DX ARL ARLD003

ARLD003 DX news

This week's bulletin was made possible with information provided by

NC1L, PS7DX, The Weekly DX, the OPDX Bulletin, 425 DX News, The

Daily DX, DXNL, Contest Corral from QST and the ARRL Contest

Calendar and WA7BNM web sites. Thanks to all.

TANZANIA, 5H. Sam, F6AML will be QRV as 5H1Z from Zanzibar Island,

IOTA AF-032, from January 20 to February 28. Activity will be in

his free time on 40 to 10 meters using CW and SSB. This may include

visits to IOTAs AF-054, AF-063 and AF-075. QSL via bureau to home

call.

SAMOA, 5W. Ralph is QRV as 5W0W from Apia until March. QSL via

NR6M.

BAHAMAS, C6. Operators W4BUW, W8GEX, W8CAA and AA4NN plan to be QRV

as C6AGH and C6DX from Great Exuma Island, IOTA NA-001, from January

20 to 27. Activity will be on 160 to 10 meters using CW, SSB and

RTTY with three stations. QSL C6AGH via W4BUW and C6DX via W8GEX.

CHILE, CE. Jose, CE8DMT is QRV from Puerto Williams on Navarino

Island, IOTA SA-050. Activity is on 40 and 15 meters using SSB.

His length of stay is unknown. QSL to home call.

ARMENIA, EK. Aram, EK6LP has been active on 12 meters around 1415z.

QSL direct via RN4LP.

REUNION ISLAND, FR. Operators F8APV and F8EOI will be QRV as

FR/home calls from January 21 to February 8. Activity will be on 40

to 10 meters using CW and SSB with a focus on 30 meter CW and 20

meter SSB. QSL to home calls.

ENGLAND, G. A group of operators will be QRV as GB6WLB from January

19 to 27 as part of the RNLI SOS Radio week. Activity will be on

most of the HF bands. QSL via G6XOU.

COLOMBIA, HK. Lothar, DK8LRF is QRV as HK3JCL from Restrepo until

March 31. Activity is on 40, 20, 17, 15 and 10 meters using SSB.

QSL to home call.

DOMINICA, J7. Operators Bernie, W3UR and Tony, N3ME will be QRV as

J77A and J76A, respectively, from January 22 to February 1 and

January 22 to February 11, respectively. Activity will be during

their spare time on 160 to 6 meters using CW, SSB and RTTY. QSL to

home calls.

MINAMI TORISHIMA, JD1. Take, JG8NQJ is QRV as JG8NQJ/JD1 from

Marcus Island, IOTA OC-073, until mid April while on work assignment

with the island's weather station. Activity will be mainly on 17 to

10 meters using CW. QSL to home call.

ANTARCTICA. Robert is QRV as LU1ZG from the Ejercito General

Belgrano II Base. Of late he has been active on 20 meters using SSB

between 0425 and 0510z. QSL via LU4DXU.

BRAZIL, PY. Members of the Natal Digital Group are QRV as special

event station PW7F until January 20 to celebrate the 413th

anniversary of Fortaleza dos Reis Magos located in the city of

Natal. Activity is on 160 to 10 meters using CW, SSB and digital

modes. QSL via PS7HD.

SUDAN, ST. Lourens, ZS6AKB is QRV as ST2/ZS6AKB in Kutum in the

Darfur region of Sudan until June while on work assignment.

Activity is in his spare time on 40, 30 and 20 meters. QSL to home

call.

EGYPT, SU. Gerd, DJ5IW is QRV as SU/DJ5IW from El Fardous until

February 8. Activity is on 40 to 10 meters using CW only in his

spare time. QSL to home call.

INDIA, VU. Gwalior, VU2JAU is QRV as ATS150 until January 20 to

commemorate the 150th birthday of orator and philosopher Swami

Vivekanada. Activity of late has been on 20 meters using SSB. QSL

via operator's instructions.

OPERATION APPROVED FOR DXCC CREDIT. The following operation is

approved for DXCC Credit: Republic of South Sudan, Z81Z, current

operation commencing January 8, 2013.

THIS WEEKEND ON THE RADIO. The ARRL January VHF Contest, North

American SSB QSO Party, AWA Linc Cundall Memorial CW Contest, QRP CW

Fox Hunt, NCCC Sprint CW Ladder, Feld Hell Sprint, LZ Open CW

Contest, YL-ISSB SSB QSO Party and Hungarian DX Contest are all on

tap for this upcoming weekend. The Run for the Bacon QRP CW Contest

is scheduled for January 21. The SKCC CW Sprint, CWops Mini-CWT

Test and QRP CW Fox Hunt are scheduled for January 23. Please see

January 2013 QST, page 87, and the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest websites

for details.

NNNN

/EX

VHF and ARES

Posted by Allan kb5doh on January 16, 2013 at 11:30 PM Comments comments (0)

ARRL January VHF Contest - Perfect for ARES Practice, Too

The ARRL has added a new "FM Only" category to ARRL VHF contests, starting with the January VHF Contest, which begins this Saturday, January 19. The contest starts at 1900 UTC and runs until Sunday night at 0359 UTC. You'll find lots of "weak signal" VHF operators using high power and sensitive antennas working hard to work your station on FM. No special gear, no big expense -- you can operate in this contest and possibly win a certificate using just the radios you already own.

It's also a perfect opportunity for ARES, SKYWARN, RACES and CERT teams to test their ability to communicate without using a repeater, just as you might have to in an actual emergency. Want to have even more fun? Drive or hike to a local hilltop and you can exercise your deployment capabilities -- it's like "Field Day In the Cold!"

You'll find lots of VHF operators hoping to work YOU! Try transmitting a "CQ Contest" on the following frequencies: 146.550 MHz simplex; 146.580 MHz simplex; also 52.525 MHz (6 meters); 223.5 MHz (1.25 meters); and 446.0 MHz (70 cm band). Remember under the new rules, you're limited to 100 watts or less, but that means you'll be on equal footing with a lot of small stations. A gain antenna (like a beam or Yagi) can really help, and a high location is a big plus, too. You'll need to know your "grid square" as that is part of the exchange of reports with other stations. - Les Rayburn, N1LF, Birmingham, former Alabama SEC [See more discussion in this issue, from ARRL Contest Update Editor Ward Silver, N0AX and from Rayburn. - ed.]

ARLD001 DX news and ARLP001 Propagation de K7RA

Posted by Allan kb5doh on January 4, 2013 at 9:35 PM Comments comments (0)

:)

SB DX @ ARL $ARLD001

ARLD001 DX news

ZCZC AE01

QST de W1AW

DX Bulletin 1 ARLD001

From ARRL Headquarters

Newington CT January 3, 2013

To all radio amateurs

SB DX ARL ARLD001

ARLD001 DX news

This week's bulletin was made possible with information provided by

NC1L, The Weekly DX, the OPDX Bulletin, 425 DX News, The Daily DX,

DXNL, Contest Corral from QST and the ARRL Contest Calendar and

WA7BNM web sites. Thanks to all.

KENYA, 5Z. Bertrand, DF3ZS and Tom, DL1QW will be QRV as 5Z4/DF3ZS

and 5Z4/DL1QW, respectively, from Diani Beach from January 7 to 20.

Activity will be on 80 to 10 meters using CW, SSB and RTTY. QSL to

home calls.

SENEGAL, 6W. Francis, F6BLP is QRV as 6W7SK until January 18 from

Saly Portudal. Activity is holiday style on 80 to 10 meters using

mostly CW. This may include some activity on 160 meters. QSL to

home call.

FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY, DA. Special event station DL50FRANCE

is QRV during all of 2013 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the

French-German Treaty of Friendship, also known as the Elysee Treaty.

QSL via DK8VR.

PHILIPPINES, DU. Bob, WT3A is QRV as DU7TET and is usually active

on 160 meters between 0945 and 1300z. QSL to home call.

ST. VINCENT, J8. Al, W6HGF will be QRV as J8/W6HGF from Saint

Vincent and the Grenadines from January 9 to 24. Activity will be

on all bands, with an emphasis on the higher bands when possible

using mostly RTTY and other digital modes. QSL direct to home call.

MONGOLIA, JT. Chak, JT1CO has been active on 30 meters around

2100z. QSL direct.

PAPUA NEW GUINEA, P2. Nao, JA2VQP is working as a volunteer and

teaching mathematics at the Divine Word University in Wewak for the

next two years. He has recently been issued the call P29NO and

plans to be active in the coming months.

NETHERLANDS, PA. Special event station PD110MVV is QRV until

January 14 to commemorate the 110th jubilee of the football club MVV

Maastricht. QSL via PD3R.

SLOVENIA, S5. Special event station S5300TP is QRV during all of

2013 to mark the 300 years since the Tolmin Peasant Uprising of

1713. QSL via S59DAP.

MOUNT ATHOS, SV/A. Monk Apollo, SV2ASP/A has been active on 40

meters using SSB around 0600z to 0700z. He has also been active on

17 meters using SSB around 1400z. QSL direct to home call.

NAMIBIA, V5. Ewald, DJ2BQ is QRV as V5/DJ2BQ until January 18.

Activity is on 80 to 10 meters using RTTY. QSL to home call.

MONTSERRAT, VP2M. Bjorn, SM0MDG is QRV as VP2MSW until January 8.

Activity is mainly on 17 and 15 meters, and possibly 10 meters if

conditions permit. QSL via M0URX.

LAOS, XW. Larry is now QRV as XW1A. Activity is on 160 to 2 meters

using CW and SSB. This will eventually include RTTY. QSL via

E21EIC.

ROMANIA, YO. Members of the Radioclub QSO Banat Timisoara are QRV

as YP10KQT during all of 2013 to celebrate their 10th anniversary.

QSL via YO2KQT.

MACEDONIA, Z3. To commemorate the assignment of the Z3 prefix 20

years ago, special event station Z320RSM is QRV. Also, Special

event stations Z320A to Z320Z are also QRV. QSL via operators'

instructions.

THIS WEEKEND ON THE RADIO. The ARRL RTTY Roundup, Kid's Day SSB

Contest, EUCW 160-Meter CW Contest, QRP CW Fox Hunt, NCCC Sprint CW

Ladder, PODXS 070 Club PSKFest and the QRP ARCI Pet Rock CW

Celebration are all on tap for this upcoming weekend. The ARS

Spartan CW Sprint is scheduled for January 8. The CWops Mini-CWT CW

Test and QRP CW Fox Hunt are scheduled for January 9. Please see

January 2013 QST, page 87, and the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest websites

for details.

NNNN

/EX

:)

SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP001

ARLP001 Propagation de K7RA

ZCZC AP01

QST de W1AW

Propagation Forecast Bulletin 1 ARLP001

From Tad Cook, K7RA

Seattle, WA January 4, 2013

To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP001

ARLP001 Propagation de K7RA

The New Year brings dreams of solar cycles of old, so distant now,

sweetly remembered for their profusion of sunspots. We hear many

times from operators who began in the amateur radio service as

teenagers at the peak of Cycle 19. With youthful optimism, they

naturally assumed that radio propagation would always be like that,

when a few watts and a modest radiator on 10 meters spanned the

globe during all the days and nights.

If you were age 13 to 17 in 1957 to 1959, the peak of Cycle 19,

perhaps you were born between 1941 and 1945, and probably looked

forward to the next peak in activity. That may have been a

disappointment when Cycle 20 peaked around 1969, as that had a

somewhat broader peak but at a far lower level. You can see it

graphically at http://wm7d.net/hamradio/solar/historical.shtml.

These young adults, now 24 to 28 years old in 1969, might be busy

starting families and careers, and no doubt fondly recalling simpler

times and the tremendous propagation of their younger years.

Cycle 21 peaked around 1980, and the former teenaged ham of Cycle 19

was now 35 to 39 years old. This was quite an improvement over the

last cycle, as was Cycle 22, which looked like an echo of Cycle 21.

Cycle 22 peaked around 1991-1992, with a more pronounced

double-peak. The former teenager was now 47 to 51 years old, solidly

into middle-age, and still wondering if sunspot activity would ever

roar back to the levels of the late-1950s.

The following cycle, number 23, was another double-peak, but

significantly lower in 2000 to 2002 than the previous cycle. Perhaps

another disappointment for the now 56 to 60 year old ham, who then

sees solar activity slide into a long and low minimum over the next

decade, impossible to imagine 60 years earlier. The 160 meter

operators, quite happy in this situation with a much quieter Sun,

have no such longing for the active Sun of yesteryear.

Now the young ham of the late 1950s contemplates the peak of Cycle

24, apparently much lower than any seen in most of the past century,

and expected to grow to maximum this year. Now we have many more

tools to observe and measure both solar activity and propagation,

and we know that activity could still increase significantly. Some

foresee decades of lower activity, but of course predicting future

solar activity is a very tricky proposition, and anything could

happen.

At

http://www.solen.info/solar/images/comparison_recent_cycles.png

you can see a comparison of recent cycles, from 21 to the current

24.

While we've seen a number of papers and predictions for a series of

quieter sunspot cycles, some disagree. For instance, Michael

Proctor, professor of Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics at Cambridge

University is not convinced. He was quoted this year as saying,

"This present cycle is similar to the weak one that ended in 1913,

and that was followed by a strong cycle."

Those were Cycles 14 and 15, and Cycle 15 was only strong relative

to 14. Cycles 17, 18 and 19 were stronger than 15, and so were 21,

22 and 23.

It is also important to remember there is wild variability in solar

activity. To make those graphs of sunspot numbers appear smooth,

each point on the graph actually represents an average of a year of

data. When averaged, the flurry of solar activity at the end of 2011

and some future activity in 2013 could appear as a broad peak on a

graph.

NASA looks frequently at their predictions for the current cycle,

and often adjusts them every month. The latest shows a smoothed

sunspot number a bit lower than the forecast from several weeks ago.

In the December 10 forecast they predicted a smoothed sunspot number

of 72 in the late in 2013, but that number is now 69 in the January

2 release. Note these are the lower international sunspot numbers,

which are always less than Boulder numbers presented in this

bulletin. Read the report at

http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/predict.shtml.

With the change from 2012 to 2013, now is a good time to review

sunspot numbers and trends. Average daily sunspot numbers in 2013

were up substantially from 2012. From 2004 through 2012 the yearly

progression was 68.6, 48.9, 26.1, 12.8, 4.7, 5.1, 25.5, 29.9 and

82.3. I took all the daily sunspot numbers for 2012, added them

together, and the sum was 30,133. Divide that by 366 (the number of

days in 2012, a leap year) and the result is approximately 82.3. In

2011 it was 10,913 divided by 365, yielding 29.9.

The 2012 average was higher than any year after 2003. But at the

peak of Cycle 23, the averages from 1998 to 2003 were all higher:

88.7, 136.3, 173, 170.3, 176.7, and 109.2. It seems unlikely that

average daily sunspot numbers this year will reach anywhere near the

level of 2000-2002.

We observe a moving 3-month average of sunspot numbers, in an

attempt to smooth out some of the variations. Unfortunately, the

past three months were much lower then the three month period ending

one month earlier. The current average of 74.4, centered on November

2012, is lower than any three month period since averages centered

on February and March of 2012.

The 3 month period previous to the current one is centered on

October 2012, and covers September through November. The average

then was 82.3. To recap averages from previous bulletins, the

three-month moving averages of daily sunspot numbers centered on

July 2011 through November 2012 were 63, 79.6, 98.6, 118.8, 118.6,

110, 83.3, 73.7, 71.2, 87.3, 91.5, 96.5, 91.9, 89.9, 81.2, 82.3, and

74.4.

Looking at the past week, yesterday we saw a sizable gain in solar

flux, when the value went from 106.7, 113.6, 117.8, and 119 to

128.8, on December 30 through January 3. NOAA and USAF predict solar

flux at 130 on January 4-6, 125 and 120 on January 7-8, 115 on

January 9-10, 110 on January 11, 105 on January 12-13, 110 on

January 14-17, 115 on January 18-20, and 120 on January 21-23.

Predicted planetary A index is 5 on January 4-12, 10 on January 13,

5 on January 14-25 and 8 on January 26.

F.K. Janda, OK1HH issues a weekly geomagnetic forecast. This week he

says geomagnetic conditions will be quiet January 4, quiet to active

January 5, mostly quite January 6, quiet January 7-9, quiet to

unsettled January 10-12, active to disturbed January 13, quiet to

unsettled January 14-16, quiet January 17-19, mostly quiet January

20-21, and quiet on January 22-26.

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,

email the author at, [email protected]

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL

Technical Information Service web page at

http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of the

numbers used in this bulletin, see

http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere. An archive of past

propagation bulletins is at

http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. Find more good

information and tutorials on propagation at

http://myplace.frontier.com/~k9la/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve

overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL

bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for December 27 through January 2 were 78, 54, 49,

37, 87, 99, and 90, with a mean of 70.6. 10.7 cm flux was 106.8,

105.8, 104.3, 106.7, 113.6, 117.8, and 119, with a mean of 110.6.

Estimated planetary A indices were 1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 1, and 3, with a

mean of 2.3. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 0, 2, 3, 4, 1, 1,

and 2, with a mean of 1.9.

NNNN

/EX

ARLB001 W1AW 2013 Winter Operating Schedule

Posted by Allan kb5doh on January 2, 2013 at 11:00 PM Comments comments (0)

:)

SB QST @ ARL $ARLB001

ARLB001 W1AW 2013 Winter Operating Schedule

ZCZC AG01

QST de W1AW

ARRL Bulletin 1 ARLB001

From ARRL Headquarters

Newington CT January 2, 2013

To all radio amateurs

SB QST ARL ARLB001

ARLB001 W1AW 2013 Winter Operating Schedule

Morning Schedule:

Time Mode Days

------------------- ---- ---------

1400 UTC (9 AM EST) CWs Wed, Fri

1400 UTC (9 AM EST) CWf Tue, Thu

Daily Visitor Operating Hours:

1500 UTC to 1700 UTC - (10 AM to 12 PM EST)

1800 UTC to 2045 UTC - (1 PM to 3:45 PM EST)

(Station closed 1700 to 1800 UTC (12 PM to 1 PM EST))

Afternoon/Evening Schedule:

2100 UTC (4 PM EST) CWf Mon, Wed, Fri

2100 " " CWs Tue, Thu

2200 " (5 PM EST) CWb Daily

2300 " (6 PM EST) DIGITAL Daily

0000 " (7 PM EST) CWs Mon, Wed, Fri

0000 " " CWf Tue, Thu

0100 " (8 PM EST) CWb Daily

0200 " (9 PM EST) DIGITAL Daily

0245 " (9:45 PM EST) VOICE Daily

0300 " (10 PM EST) CWf Mon, Wed, Fri

0300 " " CWs Tue, Thu

0400 " (11 PM EST) CWb Daily

&! nbsp; Frequencies (MHz)

-----------------

CW: 1.8025 3.5815 7.0475 14.0475 18.0975 21.0675 28.0675 147.555

DIGITAL: - 3.5975 7.095 14.095 18.1025 21.095 28.095 147.555

VOICE: 1.855 3.990 7.290 14.290 18.160 21.390 28.590 147.555

 

Notes:

CWs = Morse Code practice (slow) = 5, 7.5, 10, 13 and 15 WPM

CWf = Morse Code practice (fast) = 35, 30, 25, 20, 15, 13 and 10 WPM

CWb = Morse Code Bulletins = 18 WPM

CW frequencies include code practices, Qualifying Runs and CW

bulletins.

DIGITAL = BAUDOT (45.45 baud), BPSK31 and MFSK16 in a revolving

schedule.

Code practice texts are from QST, and the source of each practice is

given at the beginning of each practice and at the beginning of

alternate speeds.

On Tuesdays and Fridays at 2330 UTC (6:30 PM EST), Keplerian

Elements for active amateur satellites are sent on the regular

digital frequencies.

A DX bulletin replaces or is added to the regular bulletins between

0100 UTC (8 PM EST) Thursdays and 0100 UTC (8 PM EST) Fridays.

Audio from W1AW's CW code practices and CW/digital bulletins is

available using EchoLink via the W1AW Conference Server named

"W1AWBDCT." The 9:45 PM ET phone bulletin is currently unavailable

via W1AWBDCT. The audio is sent in real-time and runs concurrently

with W1AW's regular transmission schedule.

All users who connect to the conference server are muted. Please

note that any questions or comments about this server should not be

sent via the "Text" window in EchoLink. Please direct any questions

or comments to [email protected]

In a communications emergency, monitor W1AW for special bulletins as

follows: Voice on the hour, Digital at 15 minutes past the hour, and

CW on the half hour.

 

All licensed amateurs may operate the station from 1500 UTC to 1700

UTC (10 AM to 12 PM EST), and then from 1800 UTC to 2045 UTC (1 PM

to 3:45 PM EST) Monday through Friday. Be sure to bring your

current FCC amateur radio license or a photocopy.

The W1AW Operating Schedule may also be found on page 90 in the

January 2013 issue of QST or on the web at,

http://www.arrl.org/w1aw-operating-schedule .

NNNN

/EX :)

ARLP047 Propagation de K7RA

Posted by Allan kb5doh on November 26, 2012 at 8:35 PM Comments comments (0)

ARLP047 Propagation de K7RA

SB PROP @ ARL $ARLP047

ARLP047 Propagation de K7RA

 

ZCZC AP48

QST de W1AW

Propagation Forecast Bulletin 47 ARLP047

From Tad Cook, K7RA

Seattle, WA November 26, 2012

To all radio amateurs

 

SB PROP ARL ARLP047

ARLP047 Propagation de K7RA

 

This bulletin was delayed several days due to the Thanksgiving

holiday, but is up-to-date as of Monday morning.

 

In Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP046 on November 16, the average

daily sunspot number on November 8-14 was 104.9. In the next seven

day reporting period, November 15-21, the average was 126.9, a nice

increase. With solar flux, the average over the previous period was

129.5. In the most recent period it increased to 138.9.

 

In the four days (November 22-25) since the last reporting period

ended, sunspot numbers were weakening at 93, 85, 87 and 64. Solar

flux was 127,7, 126.7, 118 and 121.6.

 

The latest prediction from NOAA/USAF on Sunday, November 25, has

solar flux at 120 on November 26, 115 on November 27, 110 on

November 28, 105 on November 29-30, 100 on December 1-3, 120 on

December 4, 125 on December 5-6, 130 on December 7-11, 135 on

December 12-15, and peaking at 140 on December 16-17. It then drops

to a minimum of 110 on December 26-28 before rising again.

 

The planetary A index is predicted at 11 and 15 on November 26-27, 8

on November 28-29, 10 on November 30, 8 on December 1, 5 on December

2-4, 10 on December 5-8, 5 and 8 on December 9-10, 5 on December

11-15, 8 on December 16, and 5 on December 17-31.

 

OK1HH predicts quiet conditions November 26, quiet to unsettled

November 27, active to disturbed November 28, mostly quiet November

29 through December 2, quiet to unsettled December 3, quiet to

active December 4, quiet December 5-8, quiet to unsettled December

9, and quiet to active December 10-11.

 

On November 19, Jon Jones, N0JK of Lawrence, Kansas reported 6 and

10 meter sporadic-E propagation. He wrote, "I heard the W4CHA/b

EL88 50.079 MHz on Es around 1740 UTC. No live ops around. About 10

minutes earlier I worked PT0S while fixed mobile on 10M SSB. I was

running 100W and a mag mount whip antenna on the car. PT0S peaked up

to 10 over S-9. I was on a high ridge with a clear shot to PT0S

across the Wakarusa river valley, which helped."

 

PT0S was the expedition to St. Peter and Paul Rocks, which sits in

the mid-Atlantic Ocean at 0.9169 degrees north, 29.335 degrees west.

We received another interesting report forwarded by Frank Donovan,

W3LPL of Glenwood, Maryland. The report comes from last Thursday,

November 22, and was written by George Wallner, AA7JV, who was on

the expedition.

 

Excerpts follow: "During the short openings to JA, the demand is

very strong and pile-ups have very high densities that make copy

difficult. Still, we are happy as we have over 2500 JA contacts in

the log.

 

"There was a very good opening late afternoon on 6 meters.

Interestingly, just a few minutes before the opening 20, 17 and 15

meters went almost completely dead. I was operating 20 meter CW and

had a huge pile-up. Within one minute the pile-up completely

disappeared. There was not even one weak signal to be heard. Almost

instantly, the 6 meter radio came alive and we had over 200 QSOs in

90 minutes, mostly with Southern Europe. A very nice surprise! 20,

17 and 15 meters recovered within a few minutes and we had big

pile-ups going 15 minutes after the beginning of the disturbance.

 

"We got on 160 just after sunset at 2000Z. We could hear EU stations

working each other, but nobody could hear us. We QSYed to 80 meters,

where conditions were worse; 80 sounded like a bad 160. We then

moved to 40 and worked both CW and SSB for a few hours, returning to

160 at 2145Z, by which time 160 was in decent shape and we were able

to work a steady stream of EU stations until about 1230Z, when

conditions deteriorated. We QSYed the main station between 40 and

160 meters a few times, trying to make QSOs while keeping our

fingers in the 160 meter pie. We finished with 160 at sunrise but

could not hear any JAs, just the odd NA caller, with mostly weak to

very weak signals. We quickly QSYed to 40 at 0730Z where we were

able to work a steady stream of JAs until about 0830Z, when the band

suddenly closed to JA. Meanwhile, the second station was working NA,

EU and JA on 80 meters, under good conditions until 0800Z."

 

The disruptions George spoke of were no doubt triggered by one or

more of the several coronal mass ejections that our Sun spewed forth

last week.

 

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers,

email the author at, [email protected]

 

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL

Technical Information Service web page at

http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of the

numbers used in this bulletin, see

http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere. An archive of past

propagation bulletins is at

http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. Find more good

information and tutorials on propagation at

http://myplace.frontier.com/~k9la/.

 

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve

overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

 

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL

bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

 

Sunspot numbers for November 15 through 21 were 132, 141, 163, 136,

122, 119, and 75, with a mean of 126.9. 10.7 cm flux was 141.7,

138.3, 135.5, 141, 133.9, 141.2, and 140.4, with a mean of 138.9.

Estimated planetary A indices were 3, 5, 7, 5, 4, 11, and 7, with a

mean of 6. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 3, 5, 7, 4, 3, 10

and 7, with a mean of 5.6.

NNNN

/EX


Texoma Hamarama

Posted by Allan kb5doh on September 18, 2012 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Greetings,

I will be speaking at the Ardmore Texoma Hamarama on Saturday October 27, 2012

at 9:00 AM during the ARES-OK Forum.

Also on Saturday morning

at 10:00 AM is the ARRL Forum w/OK Section Manager Kevin O’Dell N0IRW

Ardmore Texoma Hamarama http://www.texomahamarama.org/

Oct 26 and Oct 27, 2012

Exit 33 - I-35: Ardmore, OK

Friday - Setup 12:00 Noon - Open 5:00 PM untill 8:00 PM

Saturday - Setup 7:00 AM - Open 8:00 AM untill 1:00 PM

Texoma Hamarama hamfest, forum, swap meet, expo and numerous ham radio vendors.

See you there..

73

Mark Conklin, N7XYO

Oklahoma Section Emergency Coordinator

Amateur Radio Emergency Service

918.232.8346

[email protected]

Follow me on Twitter @N7XYO

www.ARESOK.org

 

 

__._,_.___

 

 

To register with ARES-Oklahoma go to www.ARESOK.org

Reaching Out

Posted by Allan kb5doh on May 17, 2012 at 9:25 PM Comments comments (0)

:)

Hi Group, Today I am reaching out to help a fellow amateur radio operator he is blind and needs a talking watt meter that will handle at least 1000 watts more would be nice, so if any of you have information that will help us find this equipment please contact me. He had one but lost it to lightning.

73 & God Bless Everyone.

Allan=kb5doh :)

Reaching Out

Posted by Allan kb5doh on May 17, 2012 at 9:25 PM Comments comments (0)

:)

Hi Group, Today I am reaching out to help a fellow amateur radio operator he is blind and needs a talking watt meter that will handle at least 1000 watts more would be nice, so if any of you have information that will help us find this equipment please contact me. He had one but lost it to lightning.

73 & God Bless Everyone.

Allan=kb5doh :)

W5YI Fred Maia - SK

Posted by Allan kb5doh on March 30, 2012 at 7:50 PM Comments comments (0)

:( 

SB SPCL @ ARL $ARLX002

ARLX002 Fred Maia, W5YI, (SK)

ZCZC AX02

QST de W1AW

Special Bulletin 2 ARLX002

From ARRL Headquarters

Newington CT March 30, 2012

To all radio amateurs

SB SPCL ARL ARLX002

ARLX002 Fred Maia, W5YI, (SK)

The holder of one of the best-known US Amateur Radio call signs,

Frederick (Fred) Maia, W5YI, died of cancer Wednesday, March 28. He

was 76 and was a resident of Arlington, Texas.

Fred was a leading Amateur Radio journalist for nearly 35 years and

a pioneer of the volunteer examining program adopted by the FCC in

1984.

Maia published "The W5YI Report," dubbed "America's Oldest Ham Radio

Newsletter," from 1978 to 2003, and has been a CQ contributing

editor since 1985. His regulatory affairs column, first titled

"Ticket Talk," then "Washington Readout," offered news and

perspective on FCC Regulations and ITU actions. His final column

will appear in the May 2012 issue of CQ.

After the FCC adopted volunteer examining for all levels of Amateur

Radio licensing in 1984, Fred became the first Volunteer Examiner

Coordinator (VEC) appointed by the FCC. Fred subsequently founded

The W5YI Group in 1986 to develop, publish and sell amateur and

commercial radio license study materials. In the realm of FCC

commercial radio licensing, Fred formed National Radio Examiners to

provide examination services.

Maia served as President of the W5YI-VEC until his retirement in

October of 2000 when he sold The W5YI Group study material products

to Master Publishing, Inc. The retail operations were purchased by

General Manager Larry Pollock, NB5X, newly appointed President of

the W5YI-VEC and National Radio Examiners organizations. Maia

continued writing "The W5YI Report" newsletter until July 2003.

A graduate of the US Air Force Radio Operators School, Fred was an

avid CW operator. He was first licensed as a teenager as W1NTK in

Brockton, Massachusetts, where he grew up. Maia was later licensed

as W5UTT, and held DXCC CW awards and EU-PX-A CW. He was a member of

QCWA and Life Member of the ARRL.

For several decades, Maia also served on the National Conference of

Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (NCVEC) as a member of the Question

Pool Committee that oversees the development and maintenance of the

Amateur Radio license examination question pools.

ARRL Chief Executive Officer David Sumner, K1ZZ, commented: "Amateur

Radio is healthier today because of the tireless efforts of Fred

Maia. While Fred did not always see things quite the same way as the

ARRL, in my experience he always had the best interests of Amateur

Radio at heart. He was a major figure who will be sorely missed."

He is survived by his wife, Doris, and two daughters. A memorial

service will be held at 3 PM, Saturday, March 31, at Moore Funeral

Home, 1219 North Davis Dr, Arlington, TX 76012.

NNNN

/EX

ARRL Proposed 9 cm Band Plan

Posted by Allan kb5doh on March 15, 2012 at 6:25 PM Comments comments (0)

http://www.arrl.org/files/media/News/9_cm_Band_Plan-Draft.pdf

ARRL Seeks Comments on Proposed 9 cm Band Plan 

03/06/2012

 

A few months ago, the ARRL UHF/Microwave Band Plan Committee asked the Amateur Radio community about current, planned and projected uses of the amateur bands between 902 MHz and 3.5 GHz. The response was beyond our expectations, with hundreds of comments and suggestions received. Thanks to all of you who took the time to share information with us.

After reading the feedback, the committee began working on the band plans; the first draft plan ready for review is for the 9 cm band (3300-3500 MHz). Please take a moment to look over the accompanying draft (see below) and let the committee know if you have any major concerns. Draft plans for the remaining bands under study will be released for comment as they become available over the next few months.

As a reminder, the purpose of these band plans is to share information about how the amateur bands are being used and to suggest compatible frequency ranges for various types of application. We recognize that local conditions or needs may necessitate deviations from a band plan, and regional frequency coordinating bodies may recommend alternatives for use in their respective regions.

Please submit your comments via e-mail by April 9, 2012.

Thank you once again for helping us complete this important project.

73,

Rick Roderick K5UR, Chair

ARRL Microwave Band Plan Committee

http://www.arrl.org/files/media/News/9_cm_Band_Plan-Draft.pdf